Maternal caffeine consumption during pregnancy and risk of low birth weight: a dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies.

@article{Soltani2021MaternalCC,
  title={Maternal caffeine consumption during pregnancy and risk of low birth weight: a dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies.},
  author={Sanaz Soltani and Asma Salari-Moghaddam and Parvane Saneei and Mohammadreza Askari and Bagher Larijani and Leila Azadbakht and Ahmad Esmaillzadeh},
  journal={Critical reviews in food science and nutrition},
  year={2021},
  pages={
          1-10
        }
}
BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES Earlier published studies on maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy in relation to the risk of low birth weight (LBW) (birth weight <2500 g) have indicated conflicting findings. Therefore, the present systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to examine the association between maternal caffeine intake and risk of LBW. METHODS We searched for relevant articles published up to Jan 2021 through PubMed and Scopus. For this purpose, we used MESH (Medical Subject… 

References

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Maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy is associated with risk of low birth weight: a systematic review and dose–response meta-analysis
TLDR
Higher maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of delivering low birth weight infants, and these findings support recommendations to restrict caffeine consumption during pregnancy to low levels.
Maternal Caffeine Consumption during Pregnancy and Risk of Low Birth Weight: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies
TLDR
High caffeine intake during pregnancy is associated with a significant increase in the risk of LBW, and this risk appears to increase linearly as caffeine intake increases.
Caffeine intake during pregnancy and adverse birth outcomes: a systematic review and dose–response meta-analysis
TLDR
There is insufficient evidence to support further reductions in the maximum recommended intake of caffeine, but maintenance of current recommendations is a wise precaution.
Maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy is associated with birth weight but not with gestational length: results from a large prospective observational cohort study
TLDR
Caffeine intake was consistently associated with decreased BW and increased odds of SGA, and this might have clinical implications as even caffeine consumption below the recommended maximum was associated with increased risk for SGA.
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TLDR
Data from observational studies indicate that greater adherence to healthy dietary patterns during pregnancy is significantly related to lower risk of preterm birth.
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TLDR
It is suggested that heavy caffeine consumption increases the risk for fetal growth retardation.
Association between Caffeine Consumption in Pregnancy and Low Birth Weight and Preterm Birth in the birth Cohort of Ribeirão Preto.
TLDR
High caffeine intake was lower than in other studies and no association with LBW or preterm birth was found in this cohort, and high caffeine consumption was significantly associated with reduced education and with the occupation of the head of the family.
Maternal Exposure to Caffeine and Risk of Congenital Anomalies: A Systematic Review
TLDR
Current epidemiologic evidence is not adequate to assess the possibility of a small change in risk of congenital anomalies resulting from maternal caffeine consumption, and there is no evidence to support a teratogenic effect of caffeine in humans.
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TLDR
Decaffeinated coffee did not increase risk for any perinatal outcome and self-reports of caffeine consumption in the first and third trimesters were not associated with intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, or preterm delivery.
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TLDR
Maternal caffeine intake from both coffee and tea is associated with adverse birth outcomes, and the associations were robust to the exclusion of participants with pregnancy complications and in never smokers.
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