Maternal and child health in Brazil: progress and challenges

@article{Victora2011MaternalAC,
  title={Maternal and child health in Brazil: progress and challenges},
  author={Cesar Gomes Victora and Estela M L Aquino and Maria do Carmo Leal and Carlos Augusto Monteiro and Fernando C Barros and C{\'e}lia Landmann Szwarcwald},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2011},
  volume={377},
  pages={1863-1876}
}
In the past three decades, Brazil has undergone rapid changes in major social determinants of health and in the organisation of health services. In this report, we examine how these changes have affected indicators of maternal health, child health, and child nutrition. We use data from vital statistics, population censuses, demographic and health surveys, and published reports. In the past three decades, infant mortality rates have reduced substantially, decreasing by 5·5% a year in the 1980s… 
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