Maternal age‐specific fetal loss rates in Down syndrome pregnancies

@article{Savva2006MaternalAF,
  title={Maternal age‐specific fetal loss rates in Down syndrome pregnancies},
  author={George M. Savva and Joan K. Morris and David E Mutton and Eva D. Alberman},
  journal={Prenatal Diagnosis},
  year={2006},
  volume={26}
}
Pregnancies affected by Down syndrome (DS) have a greater risk of spontaneous fetal loss than those that are unaffected. In this article, we investigate the relationship between maternal age and the risk of spontaneous fetal loss in DS pregnancies. 
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