Maternal adverse effects of different antenatal magnesium sulphate regimens for improving maternal and infant outcomes: a systematic review

@article{Bain2013MaternalAE,
  title={Maternal adverse effects of different antenatal magnesium sulphate regimens for improving maternal and infant outcomes: a systematic review},
  author={Emily Bain and Philippa F Middleton and Caroline A. Crowther},
  journal={BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth},
  year={2013},
  volume={13},
  pages={195 - 195}
}
BackgroundAntenatal magnesium sulphate, widely used in obstetrics to improve maternal and infant outcomes, may be associated with adverse effects for the mother sufficient for treatment cessation. This systematic review aimed to quantify maternal adverse effects attributed to treatment, assess how adverse effects vary according to different regimens, and explore women’s experiences with this treatment.MethodsBibliographic databases were searched from their inceptions to July 2012 for studies of… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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  • Medicine
  • The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians
  • 2021
TLDR
The results of this systematic review support continued use of 24 h of postpartum magnesium sulfate for seizure prophylaxis for pregnant women diagnosed with preeclampsia. Expand
Safety and Efficacy of Tocolytics for the Treatment of Spontaneous Preterm Labour.
TLDR
The perfect tocolytic that is uniformly effective and safe does not exist and efforts continue to develop and introduce other or better agents, including novel compounds such as progesterone, PGF2α antagonists and statins. Expand
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Magnesium sulphate is ineffective at delaying birth or preventing preterm birth, and its use is associated with an increased mortality for the infant. Expand
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TLDR
The role for antenatal magnesium sulphate therapy as a neuroprotective agent for the preterm fetus is not yet established and outcomes later in childhood should be evaluated to determine the presence or absence of later potentially important neurologic effects, particularly on motor or cognitive function. Expand
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TLDR
Maternal morbidity rate is higher with prolonged intake of tocolytic magnesium sulfate compared to ≤48‐h regimen and, despite similar neonatal morbidity and mortality rates, bone demineralization in the neonates may be encountered. Expand
Do women with pre-eclampsia, and their babies, benefit from magnesium sulphate? The Magpie Trial: a randomised placebo-controlled trial
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A randomised comparative study between low-dose intravenous magnesium sulphate and standard intramuscular regimen for treatment of eclampsia
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  • Medicine
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TLDR
Low-dose intravenous magnesium sulphate was found to be as effective as the standard intramuscular regimen, while maintaining a high safety margin, for the management of eclampsia. Expand
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TLDR
Good local and systemic tolerability of high dose magnesium sulphate for tocolysis showed and the introduction of the ready-to-use solution has the advantage of eliminating the need to mix the solution prior to administration, which means a lower risk of overdose and contamination. Expand
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