Maternal Na+ intake induces renal function injury in rats prevented by a short-term angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor.

@article{Ribeiro2017MaternalNI,
  title={Maternal Na+ intake induces renal function injury in rats prevented by a short-term angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor.},
  author={Natalie E Ribeiro and Edjair Vicente Cabral and Regina S. Aires and Leucio Duarte Vieira-Filho and Valdilene S. Ribeiro and Daianna Rm Gonçalves and Luis Pnc Borges and Ismaela Mf Melo and Cintia Gm Ferreira and Val{\'e}ria Wanderley-Teixeira and {\'A}lvaro Ac Teixeira and An{\'i}sio Francisco Soares and Ana Durce O Paix{\~a}o},
  journal={Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology},
  year={2017},
  volume={44 2},
  pages={275-284}
}
The Na+ -ATPase, a secondary pump in the proximal tubule, is only weakly responsive to angiotensin II in adult offspring exposed perinatally to high Na+ intake. We have investigated whether the offspring from mothers given 0.3 mol/L NaCl show an ineffective angiotensin II action to increase in blood pressure. It was hypothesized that functional alterations at adult life are associated with the number of angiotensin II-positive cells in the developing kidney, with increased oxidative stress in… CONTINUE READING