Maternal Mortality and Morbidity in the United States: Classification, Causes, Preventability, and Critical Care Obstetric Implications

@article{Troiano2018MaternalMA,
  title={Maternal Mortality and Morbidity in the United States: Classification, Causes, Preventability, and Critical Care Obstetric Implications},
  author={Nan H. Troiano and Patricia M Witcher},
  journal={The Journal of Perinatal \& Neonatal Nursing},
  year={2018},
  volume={32},
  pages={222–231}
}
The United States has experienced a steady rise in pregnancy-related deaths over the last 3 decades. The rate of severe maternal morbidity has also increased. It is estimated that approximately 50% of maternal deaths are preventable. National, multidisciplinary, collaborative efforts are required to effectively address this problem. The complex nature of certain conditions and the concomitant risk of significant maternal morbidity and mortality have yielded a subset of women who require… Expand
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