Material Girls: Silk and Self-Fashioning in Tang China (618–907)

@article{Chen2017MaterialGS,
  title={Material Girls: Silk and Self-Fashioning in Tang China (618–907)},
  author={Bu Yun Chen},
  journal={Fashion Theory},
  year={2017},
  volume={21},
  pages={33 - 5}
}
  • B. Chen
  • Published 2 January 2017
  • Art
  • Fashion Theory
Abstract Tang dynasty China was a fashionable place. Low-cut necklines, kaftans sewn from sumptuously brocaded silks, diaphanous shawls cut from resist-dyed silk gauze, and striped skirts elaborately patterned with rosettes abound in the visual and material archive. This article takes a closer look at the Tang woman’s wardrobe to show how changes in dress and shifts in the perceptions of dress signified the emergence of a fashion system. It argues that what manifested in the second half of the… 
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