Mate sampling behaviour of female pied flycatchers: evidence for active mate choice

@article{Dale2004MateSB,
  title={Mate sampling behaviour of female pied flycatchers: evidence for active mate choice},
  author={Svein Dale and Trond Amundsen and Jan T. Lifjeld and Tore Slagsvold},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={27},
  pages={87-91}
}
SummaryThis paper presents major new evidence for active mate choice of female pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca. Fifteen color-ringed females were released into a study area containing 23 unmated males defending one nestbox each. Through intensive surveillance, the behavior of the females was observed during 2 consecutive days. Twenty-two of the males received a total of 131 female visits. Six of the females settled in the study area, and their premating period lasted 1.3–2.5 days. The… Expand

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