Mate choice based on a key ecological performance trait

@article{Snowberg2009MateCB,
  title={Mate choice based on a key ecological performance trait},
  author={Lisa K. Snowberg and Craig W. Benkman},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={22}
}
Mate preference for well‐adapted individuals may strengthen divergent selection and thereby facilitate adaptive divergence. We performed mate choice experiments in which we manipulated male red crossbill (Loxia curvirostra complex) feeding rates. Using association time as a proxy for preference, we found that females preferred faster foragers, which reinforces natural selection because poorly adapted males would be less likely to obtain a mate as well as less likely to survive. Although… Expand

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