Mast cell tryptase: a review of its physiology and clinical significance

@article{Payne2004MastCT,
  title={Mast cell tryptase: a review of its physiology and clinical significance},
  author={Vivienne Payne and Peter Ca Kam},
  journal={Anaesthesia},
  year={2004},
  volume={59}
}
Mast cells, which are granulocytes found in peripheral tissue, play a central role in inflammatory and immediate allergic reactions. β‐Tryptase is a neutral serine protease and is the most abundant mediator stored in mast cell granules. The release of β‐tryptase from the secretory granules is a characteristic feature of mast cell degranulation. While its biological function has not been fully clarified, mast cell β‐tryptase has an important role in inflammation and serves as a marker of mast… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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