Massage therapy as a supportive care intervention for children with cancer.

@article{Hughes2008MassageTA,
  title={Massage therapy as a supportive care intervention for children with cancer.},
  author={D Hughes and Elena J. Ladas and Diane Rooney and Kara M Kelly},
  journal={Oncology nursing forum},
  year={2008},
  volume={35 3},
  pages={
          431-42
        }
}
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES To review relevant literature about massage therapy to assess the feasibility of integrating the body-based complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practice as a supportive care intervention for children with cancer. DATA SOURCES PubMed, online references, published government reports, and the bibliographies of retrieved articles, reviews, and books on massage and massage and cancer. More than 70 citations were reviewed. DATA SYNTHESIS Massage therapy may help… Expand
Massage therapy for cancer palliation and supportive care: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials
  • E. Ernst
  • Medicine
  • Supportive Care in Cancer
  • 2008
TLDR
It is suggested that massage can alleviate a wide range of symptoms: pain, nausea, anxiety, depression, anger, stress and fatigue, but the methodological quality of the included studies was poor, which prevents definitive conclusions. Expand
Massage in children with cancer: effectiveness of a protocol.
TLDR
Despite the small sample size, massage therapy appears to be a useful intervention in reducing pain in children with cancer, and the authors recommend its use due to its contribution to the promotion of the child's well-being and quality of life. Expand
Pain in children with central nervous system cancer: a review of the literature.
TLDR
The HRTI model provides an appropriate framework to gain insight into the pediatric oncology nursing role in the assessment, management, and evaluation of pain from childhood cancers. Expand
Massage in children with cancer: effectiveness of a protocol
TLDR
Despite the small sample size, massage therapy appears to be a useful intervention in reducing pain in children with cancer, and the authors recommend its use due to its contribution to the promotion of the child’s well-being and quality of life. Expand
Nonpharmacological Interventions for Pain Management in Lung Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review
TLDR
Results indicate that the nonpharmacological interventions such as physical treatment interventions, selfmanagement and coaching interventions, cognitive behavioral interventions, and technologybased interventions or coping skills interventions had limited and shortterm effects on alleviating pain among the patients. Expand
Massage for Children Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Qualitative Report
TLDR
Massage/acupressure may support symptom relief and promote relaxation and sleep among pediatric HCT patients if administered with attention to individual patients' needs and hospital routines and may relieve stress among parents, improve caregiver competence, and enhance the sense of connection between parent and child. Expand
Effects of Massage Therapy on the Relief of Cancer Pain
TLDR
Evidence from studies reviewed in this chapter documents that patients/subjects in massage groups appeared to have more positive outcomes compared to those in control groups in terms of decreasing pain intensity, nausea or vomiting, fatigue, distressing symptoms, anxiety, depression, and self-reports of relaxation. Expand
Pediatric Cancer Pain Management
TLDR
Developmental aspects in the assessment and management of pediatric cancer pain, causes of treatment-related pain, and management strategies for refractory pain that is not well-controlled with high-dose opioid therapy both during treatment and for end-stage disease are discussed. Expand
Effects of massage therapy on pain and anxiety arising from intrathecal therapy or bone marrow aspiration in children with cancer.
TLDR
This study provides preliminary evidence for the effectiveness in children of massage in reducing pain and anxiety arising from intrathecal therapy or bone marrow aspiration in children with cancer. Expand
How Effective Are Spiritual Care and Body Manipulation Therapies in Pediatric Oncology? A Systematic Review of the Literature
TLDR
Based on the data collected, it is the complementary and alternative medicine with the most evidence in favor of effectiveness of the well-being of pediatric oncology patients, especially during painful procedures, and it is also recommended to use art therapy and music therapy. Expand
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References

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Massage therapy for patients with cancer.
TLDR
Oncology nurses can be advocates for patients seeking massage therapy by educating them to be informed consumers of massage therapy and stress that patients with cancer use massage therapists who have graduated from accredited programs, meet state licensure requirements, and have specialized training in the massage of Patients with cancer. Expand
Outcomes of therapeutic massage for hospitalized cancer patients.
TLDR
The findings support the potential for massage as a nursing therapeutic for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy or radiation therapy and support Rogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings and Watson's theory of human caring. Expand
Massage therapy for symptom control: outcome study at a major cancer center.
TLDR
Data indicate that massage therapy is associated with substantive improvement in cancer patients' symptom scores, and benefits persisted, with outpatients experiencing no return toward baseline scores throughout the duration of 48-hour follow-up. Expand
Massage therapy for cancer patients: a reciprocal relationship between body and mind
TLDR
Although a meta-analysis concludes that massage can confer short-term benefits in terms of psychological wellbeing and reduction of some symptoms, additional validated randomized controlled studies are necessary to determine specific indications for various types of therapeutic massage. Expand
The effect of massage on pain in cancer patients.
TLDR
Massage was shown to be an effective short-term nursing intervention for pain in males in this sample and there were no significant differences between pain 1 hour and 2 hours after the massage in comparison with the initial pain for males or females. Expand
Massage relieves nausea in women with breast cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy.
TLDR
This study complements previous studies on the effect of massage and supports the conclusion that massage reduces nausea in patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Expand
An evaluation of the use of massage and essential oils on the wellbeing of cancer patients.
TLDR
Findings from the study suggest that massage has a significant effect on anxiety and this was found to be greater where essential oils were used, although the small sample prevented this from being established conclusively. Expand
Therapeutic Massage and Healing Touch Improve Symptoms in Cancer
TLDR
Therapeutic massage and healing touch are more effective than presence alone or standard care in reducing pain, mood disturbance, and fatigue in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. Expand
The role of aromatherapy massage in reducing anxiety in patients with malignant brain tumours.
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  • Medicine
  • International journal of palliative nursing
  • 2001
TLDR
There was a statistically significant reduction in all four physical parameters, which suggests that AM affects the autonomic nervous system, inducing relaxation in patients with a primary malignant brain tumour attending their first follow-up appointment after radiotherapy. Expand
Aromatherapy and massage in palliative care.
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  • Medicine
  • International journal of palliative nursing
  • 1995
TLDR
Responses to the post-therapy questionnaire indicate that patients consider the massage or aromatherapy to be beneficial in reducing anxiety, tension, pain and depression. Expand
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