Massacres and Morality: Mass Killing in an Age of Civilian Immunity

@article{Bellamy2012MassacresAM,
  title={Massacres and Morality: Mass Killing in an Age of Civilian Immunity},
  author={Alex J. Bellamy},
  journal={Human Rights Quarterly},
  year={2012},
  volume={34},
  pages={927 - 958}
}
  • A. Bellamy
  • Published 1 November 2012
  • Political Science, Philosophy
  • Human Rights Quarterly
The norm of civilian immunity, which holds that civilians must not be intentionally targeted in war or subjected to mass killing, is widely supported and considered a jus cogens principle of international law. Yet not only does mass killing remain a recurrent feature of world politics, but perpetrators sometimes avoid criticism or punishment. This article argues that the paradox can be explained by understanding that civilian immunity confronts a protracted struggle with competing ideologies… 
The humanisation of security? Towards an International Human Protection Regime
  • A. Bellamy
  • Political Science
    European Journal of International Security
  • 2016
Abstract Over the past few decades, genocidal killing and other mass atrocities have become less frequent and less lethal. At the same time, collective international responses have become more common
Fewer civilian casualties: Trending toward a constraint on the use of force
Abstract In response to World War II's immense collateral damage from airpower, the United States implemented laws, policies, strategies, and technologies to protect civilians during war. When
Gender violence in armed conflicts
VIToR RodRIGUES VIANA, JoRGE SAMPAIo, PHILIPPE ScHMITTER, ANA SANToS PINTo, MARIA doLoRES ALGoRA WEBER, cARLoS GASPAR Gender Violence in Armed conflicts GENdER VIoLENcE IN ARMEd coNFLIcTS Violence
GENOCIDE IN NORTHWESTERN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA: A SOCIOLOGICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL ANALYSIS OF CRIMES AGAINST HUMANS AND AGAINST HUMANITY DURING AND AFTER THE WAR
The aim of this study is to reach a new understanding of genocide in northwestern Bosnia and Herzegovina during and after the Bosnian War (1992–1995). The analytical basis is a literature review of

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 19 REFERENCES
The politics of defining justice after the Cambodian genocide
The Harvard philosopher John Rawls makes the following comparison between truth and justice: “Justice is the Ž rst virtue of social institutions , as truth is of systems of thought. A theory however
Just war criteria and the new face of war: Human shields, manufactured martyrs, and little boys with stones
This article applies jus in bello criteria to a relatively novel tactic in asymmetrical warfare: the attempt by a conventionally weaker force to shape the conditions of combat so that the (morally
The Martens Clause, Principles of Humanity, and Dictates of Public Conscience
Together with the principle prohibiting weapons “of a nature to cause superfluous injury” or “calculated to cause unnecessary suffering,” the Martens clause, in the Preamble to the Hague Conventions
Are ‘New Wars’ More Atrocious? Battle Severity, Civilians Killed and Forced Migration Before and After the End of the Cold War
It is widely believed that the human impact of civil conflict in the present era is especially destructive. Proponents of the ‘new wars’ thesis hold that today’s conflicts are fuelled by exclusive
Victory by Duress: Civilian Infrastructure as a Target in Air Campaigns
Recent trends in the use of air power by the United States have given rise to a striking paradox. Although better technology allows air campaigns to be more discriminating, and norms against directly
Legitimacy and Authority in International Politics
What motivates states to follow international norms, rules, and commitments? All social systems must confront what we might call the problem of social control—that is, how to get actors to comply
International Norm Dynamics and Political Change
Norms have never been absent from the study of international politics, but the sweeping “ideational turn” in the 1980s and 1990s brought them back as a central theoretical concern in the field. Much
Norms Are What States Make of Them: The Political Psychology of Norm Violation
I examine why states violate norms they embrace as members of international society. The rationalist answer, that norms are violated whenever they conflict with interests, is underspecified and
“Draining the Sea”: Mass Killing and Guerrilla Warfare
Why do some wars result in the intentional killing of large numbers of civilians? In this article we examine the incidence of mass killing in all wars from 1945 to 2000. In the statistical analysis
Myth, nationalism and genocide
In the second half of 1978, the Pol Pot regime was in its death throes. A rebellion had spread in the Eastern Zone of Cambodia, and was proving difŽ cult to suppress. One Cambodian man who lived
...
1
2
...