Mass transport in arteries and the localization of atherosclerosis.

@article{Tarbell2003MassTI,
  title={Mass transport in arteries and the localization of atherosclerosis.},
  author={John M Tarbell},
  journal={Annual review of biomedical engineering},
  year={2003},
  volume={5},
  pages={
          79-118
        }
}
  • J. Tarbell
  • Published 28 November 2003
  • Biology
  • Annual review of biomedical engineering
Atherosclerosis is a disease of the large arteries that involves a characteristic accumulation of high-molecular-weight lipoprotein in the arterial wall. This review focuses on the mass transport processes that mediate the focal accumulation of lipid in arteries and places particular emphasis on the role of fluid mechanical forces in modulating mass transport phenomena. In the final analysis, four mass transport mechanisms emerge that may be important in the localization of atherosclerosis… 

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