Mass gains of the Antarctic ice sheet exceed losses

@article{Zwally2015MassGO,
  title={Mass gains of the Antarctic ice sheet exceed losses},
  author={H. Jay Zwally and Jun Li and John W. Robbins and Jack L. Saba and Donghui Yi and Anita C. Brenner},
  journal={Journal of Glaciology},
  year={2015},
  volume={61},
  pages={1019-1036}
}
During 2003 to 2008, the mass gain of the Antarctic ice sheet from snow accumulation exceeded the mass loss from ice discharge by 49 Gt/yr (2.5% of input), as derived from ICESat laser measurements of elevation change. The net gain (86 Gt/yr) over the West Antarctic (WA) and East Antarctic ice sheets (WA and EA) is essentially unchanged from revised results for 1992 to 2001 from ERS radar altimetry. Imbalances in individual drainage systems (DS) are large (-68% to +103% of input), as are… 
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