Mass Prediction in Theropod Dinosaurs

@article{Christiansen2004MassPI,
  title={Mass Prediction in Theropod Dinosaurs},
  author={Per Christiansen and R.A. Fari{\~n}a †},
  journal={Historical Biology},
  year={2004},
  volume={16},
  pages={85 - 92}
}
Body size is a crucial life history parameter for an organism. Therefore, mass estimation for fossil species is important for many kinds of analyses. Several attempts have been made to yield equations applicable to dinosaurs. In this paper, we offer bi- and multivariate equations based on log transformed appendicular skeleton data from a sample of 16 theropods which were known from reasonably complete skeletal remains, and spanning a wide size range. Body masses of the included taxa had been… 

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