Mass Imprisonment and the Life Course: Race and Class Inequality in U.S. Incarceration

@article{Pettit2004MassIA,
  title={Mass Imprisonment and the Life Course: Race and Class Inequality in U.S. Incarceration},
  author={Becky Pettit and Bruce Western},
  journal={American Sociological Review},
  year={2004},
  volume={69},
  pages={151 - 169}
}
Although growth in the U.S. prison population over the past twenty-five years has been widely discussed, few studies examine changes in inequality in imprisonment. We study penal inequality by estimating lifetime risks of imprisonment for black and white men at different levels of education. Combining administrative, survey, and census data, we estimate that among men born between 1965 and 1969, 3 percent of whites and 20 percent of blacks had served time in prison by their early thirties. The… Expand

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