Mary Barkas: a New Zealand pioneer at the Maudsley

@article{Kaplan2016MaryBA,
  title={Mary Barkas: a New Zealand pioneer at the Maudsley},
  author={Robert M Kaplan},
  journal={Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine},
  year={2016},
  volume={34},
  pages={205 - 208}
}
  • R. Kaplan
  • Published 1 March 2016
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine
Objective An account of the life of pioneer New Zealand psychiatrist Mary Barkas. Conclusion At a time when women were rare in psychiatry, New Zealand-born Mary Barkas excelled. A pioneer in the early years of the Maudsley Hospital, Barkas demonstrated her versatility in organic psychiatry, psychoanalysis and child psychiatry. Her career was terminated at an early stage and her life took a puzzling turn after she returned to New Zealand in 1933. Many questions about this intriguing and… 
Mary Barkas at the Maudsley: 1923–1927
  • R. Kaplan
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Journal of medical biography
  • 2017
TLDR
The Maudsley Hospital, reopened in January 1923, became the centre of British psychiatric research and achieved a world-wide reputation, and New Zealand-born Mary Barkas was the only woman among the first four psychiatrists appointed.

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