Marsh woundwort, Stachys palustris L. (Lamiaceae): an overlooked food plant

@article{uczaj2011MarshWS,
  title={Marsh woundwort, Stachys palustris L. (Lamiaceae): an overlooked food plant},
  author={Łukasz Łuczaj and Ingvar Svanberg and Piotr K{\"o}hler},
  journal={Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution},
  year={2011},
  volume={58},
  pages={783-793}
}
The aim of this article is to study the geographical distribution and historical patterns of use of a little known root crop native to Europe—marsh woundwort Stachys palustris L. The species grows in wet grasslands and arable fields. It produces edible tubers. Both ethnographic literature and archival sources were searched. Seventeen reliable references concerning the consumption of S. palustris in southern and south–eastern Poland were found. The tubers were usually dried and powdered, and… 

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