Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Triggers

@article{Kipp2007MarsSL,
  title={Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Triggers},
  author={Devin M. Kipp and M. San Martin and John C. Essmiller and David Wesley Way},
  journal={2007 IEEE Aerospace Conference},
  year={2007},
  pages={1-10}
}
In 2010, plans call for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission to pioneer the next generation of robotic entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. Improved altitude performance, coupled with latitude limits as large as 45 degrees off the equator and a precise delivery to within 10 km of a surface target, will allow the science community to select the MSL landing site from thousands of scientifically interesting… 

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