Mars: Influence of Topography on Formation of Temporary Bright Patches

@article{Oleary1967MarsIO,
  title={Mars: Influence of Topography on Formation of Temporary Bright Patches},
  author={B T O'leary and Donald G. Rea},
  journal={Science},
  year={1967},
  volume={155},
  pages={317 - 319}
}
The Mountains of Mitchel and other temporary bright patches observed on the Martian disk may be carbon-dioxide condensations in depressions rather than a water-ice mixture on mountains as previously thought. This interpretation supports the hypothesis that the Martian deserts, that is, the light areas, are lower than their surroundings. 
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