Marriage and the Law: Politics and Theology in Measure for Measure

@article{Meilaender2012MarriageAT,
  title={Marriage and the Law: Politics and Theology in Measure for Measure},
  author={Peter C. Meilaender},
  journal={Perspectives on Political Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={41},
  pages={195 - 200}
}
Abstract In Measure for Measure, Shakespeare portrays a clearly political problem: a city whose citizens are so unable to govern themselves that only the most severe legal punishments appear capable of restoring civic order. Yet the play's conclusion, for all its dramatic fireworks, does not obviously resolve this problem. All that happens, it appears, is that everyone gets married. Understanding marriage's political significance, therefore, is key to unraveling the play's political teaching… 
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221. Oddly, Jaffa makes the Pauline comparison in reference to a comment of Angelo's in II.iv, rather than to the more obvious echo, which I examine below, at IV.iv
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