Marriage Bars: Discrimination Against Married Women Workers, 1920&Apos;S to 1950&Apos;S

@article{Goldin1988MarriageBD,
  title={Marriage Bars: Discrimination Against Married Women Workers, 1920\&Apos;S to 1950\&Apos;S},
  author={Claudia Dale Goldin},
  journal={Economic History},
  year={1988}
}
  • C. Goldin
  • Published 1 October 1988
  • Economics, History
  • Economic History
Modern personnel practices, social consensus, and the Depression acted in concert to delay the emergence of married women in the American economy through an institution known as the "marriage bar." Marriage bars were policies adopted by firms and local school boards, from about the early 1900's to 1950, to fire single women when they married and not to hire married women. I explore their determinants using firm-level data from 1931 and 1940 and find they are associated with promotion from… 
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