Market forces predict grooming reciprocity in female baboons

@article{Barrett1999MarketFP,
  title={Market forces predict grooming reciprocity in female baboons},
  author={Louise Barrett and Stephanus Peter Henzi and Tony Weingrill and John E. Lycett and Russell A. Hill},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1999},
  volume={266},
  pages={665 - 670}
}
We argue that grooming is a commodity that female primates can trade, either for itself or in exchange for other services (sensu biological markets theory) and that the decision to do either will depend on the degree of competition within a social group. We test this using data from four chacma baboon troops, living in two populations that differ markedly in the degree of contest competition. As predicted by the predominance of grooming dyads in which females are closely ranked there was, in… Expand

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