Marked Campylobacteriosis Decline after Interventions Aimed at Poultry, New Zealand

@inproceedings{Sears2011MarkedCD,
  title={Marked Campylobacteriosis Decline after Interventions Aimed at Poultry, New Zealand},
  author={Ann Sears and Michael G. Baker and Nick Wilson and Jonathan Marshall and Petra Muellner and Donald M. Campbell and Robin J. Lake and Nigel P French},
  booktitle={Emerging infectious diseases},
  year={2011}
}
Beginning in the 1980s, New Zealand experienced rising annual rates of campylobacteriosis that peaked in 2006. We analyzed notification, hospitalization, and other data to explore the 2007-2008 drop in campylobacteriosis incidence. Source attribution techniques based on genotyping of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from patients and environmental sources were also used to examine the decline. In 2008, the annual campylobacteriosis notification rate was 161.5/100,000 population, representing a 54… CONTINUE READING
Highly Cited
This paper has 71 citations. REVIEW CITATIONS

From This Paper

Figures, tables, and topics from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 53 citations

72 Citations

051015'12'14'16'18
Citations per Year
Semantic Scholar estimates that this publication has 72 citations based on the available data.

See our FAQ for additional information.

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 29 references

Molecular Epidemiology and Veterinary Public Health Group. Enhancing surveillance of potentially foodborne enteric diseases in New Zealand: Human campylobacteriosis in the Manawatu

  • N French
  • Palmerston North (NZ): Hopkirk Institute;
  • 2008
Highly Influential
13 Excerpts

Molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni in a geographically isolated country with a uniquely structured poultry industry

  • P Müllner, JM Collins-Emerson, AC Midwinter, P Carter, SE Spencer, P van der Logt
  • Appl Environ Microbiol
  • 2010
2 Excerpts

Dynamic modelling of Campylobacter sources in the Manawatu

  • N French, J. Marshall
  • Palmerston North (NZ): Hopkirk Institute;
  • 2009
1 Excerpt