Marital Residence among Foragers

@article{Marlowe2004MaritalRA,
  title={Marital Residence among Foragers},
  author={F. Marlowe},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2004},
  volume={45},
  pages={277 - 284}
}
  • F. Marlowe
  • Published 2004
  • Sociology
  • Current Anthropology
In many species of mammals and birds, individuals leave their natal group or area upon maturity. Often, one sex remains (is philopatric) and the other disperses, and this is usually but not always attributed to inbreeding avoidance (Greenwood 1980, Moore and Ali 1984, Perrin and Mazalov 1999, Pusey and Packer 1987, Waser 1996). Sexbiased dispersal has important consequences in terms of male versus female kin-bonding or nepotism, the relative status of the sexes, mate acquisition, group defense… Expand
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