Marine toxins and the cytoskeleton: okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins

@article{Vale2008MarineTA,
  title={Marine toxins and the cytoskeleton: okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins},
  author={C. Vale and L. Botana},
  journal={The FEBS Journal},
  year={2008},
  volume={275}
}
Okadaic acid (OA) and its analogs, the dinophysistoxins, are potent inhibitors of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A. This action is well known to cause diarrhea and gastrointestinal symptons when the toxins reach the digestive tract by ingestion of mollusks. A less well‐known effect of these group of toxins is their effect in the cytoskeleton. OA has been shown to stimulate cell motility, loss of stabilization of focal adhesions and a consequent loss of cytoskeletal organization due to an… Expand
Is Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Responsible for the Toxic Effects of Okadaic Acid in Animals?
TLDR
The evidence for the involvement of protein phosphatase inhibition in the induction of the toxic effects of OA and its derivatives is examined, with the conclusion that the mechanism of toxicity of these substances requires re-evaluation. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
The results suggest that okadaic acid activates general cell signaling pathways that induce breakdown of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Okadaic acid induces morphological changes, apoptosis and cell cycle alterations in different human cell types.
TLDR
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