Marine debris and human impacts on sea turtles in southern Brazil.

@article{Bugoni2001MarineDA,
  title={Marine debris and human impacts on sea turtles in southern Brazil.},
  author={L. Bugoni and L. Krause and M. Petry},
  journal={Marine pollution bulletin},
  year={2001},
  volume={42 12},
  pages={
          1330-4
        }
}
Dead stranded sea turtles were recovered and examined to determine the impact of anthropogenic debris and fishery activities on sea turtles on the coast of Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Esophagus/stomach contents of 38 juvenile green Chelonia mydas, 10 adults and sub-adults loggerhead Caretta caretta, and two leatherback Dermochelys coriacea turtles (adult or sub-adult) included plastic bags as the main debris ingested, predominated by white and colorless pieces. The ingestion of… Expand
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