Marine chemical ecology: what's known and what's next?

@article{Hay1996MarineCE,
  title={Marine chemical ecology: what's known and what's next?},
  author={M. Hay},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology},
  year={1996},
  volume={200},
  pages={103-134}
}
  • M. Hay
  • Published 1996
  • Biology
  • Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
In this review, I summarize recent developments in marine chemical ecology and suggest additional studies that should be especially productive. Direct tests in both the field and laboratory show that secondary metabolites commonly function as defenses against consumers. However, some metabolites also diminish fouling, inhibit competitors or microbial pathogens, and serve as gamete attractants; these alternative functions are less thoroughly investigated. We know little about how consumers… Expand
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References

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Although numerous seaweed characteristics can deter some herbivores, the effects of morphology and chemistry have been studied most thoroughly and these types of seaweeds may be considered herbivore tolerant. Expand
Botanical Defenses. (Book Reviews: Plant Resistance to Herbivores and Pathogens. Ecology, Evolution, and Genetics.)
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Results of this broad survey cast doubt on the widely accepted notion that virtually all marine larvae are suitable prey for most generalized planktivores, and suggest that unpalatable larvae often may be aposematically colored. Expand
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It is demonstrated that taxonomically diverse ascidians from habitats characterized by intense predation pressure produce secondary metabolites that significantly reduce predation on both adults and larvae, and suggested that this defensive chemistry may be crucial in allowing the release of large, well—provisioned larvae during daylight periods when larvae have the greatest probability of using photic cues to select physically appropriate settlement sites. Expand
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  • M. Hay
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Trends in ecology & evolution
  • 1991
TLDR
Ecological similarities between these small marine herbivores and numerous terrestrial insects suggest that herbivorous insects also may have evolved a preference for toxic plants because this diminishes their losses to predators, parasites and pathogens. Expand
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TLDR
Although calcification of algal tissues has generally been considered a structural defense that hardens seaweed thalli and makes them more resistant to attack, the decreased feeding on CaCO3-containing foods in the authors' assays occurred without any measurable alter- ation of food toughness. Expand
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TLDR
Variation in grazing location had important consequences for N. annulata, and within-individual variation in defenses in the alga tested the hypothesis that surgeonfishes are deterred from feeding by calcium carbonate but not by chemical defenses, whereas parrotfishes aren't deterred. Expand
Constraints on Chemically Mediated Coevolution: Multiple Functions for Seaweed Secondary Metabolites
TLDR
Diterpene alcohols produced by the brown seaweed Dictyota menstrualis deter feeding by numerous species of abundant herbivores and may prevent fouling organisms from colonizing the surface of this alga. Expand
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