Marijuana and ethanol: Differential effects on time perception, heart rate, and subjective response

@article{Tinklenberg2004MarijuanaAE,
  title={Marijuana and ethanol: Differential effects on time perception, heart rate, and subjective response},
  author={J. R. Tinklenberg and Walton T. Roth and Bert S. Kopell},
  journal={Psychopharmacology},
  year={2004},
  volume={49},
  pages={275-279}
}
Performance on a time production task, heart rate, and subjective responses were studied in twelve male subjects given oral doses of marijuana (0.7 mg of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/kg), ethanol (1.0 ml/kg), and placebo, on three testing days which were each separated by 1 week. Orders were balanced across subjects and testing conditions were doubleblind. Compared to ethanol and placebo, marijuana induced a significant under-production of time intervals, suggesting an acceleration of the… 
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