Margaret Morgan's Story: A Threshold between Slavery and Freedom, 1820–1842

@article{Reid2012MargaretMS,
  title={Margaret Morgan's Story: A Threshold between Slavery and Freedom, 1820–1842},
  author={Patricia A. Reid},
  journal={Slavery \& Abolition},
  year={2012},
  volume={33},
  pages={359 - 380}
}
This article goes beyond previous interpretations of the Prigg v. Pennsylvania opinion by focusing on the historical circumstances and lived experiences of Margaret Morgan and her family and other African Americans who lived along the Mason–Dixon line. By examining the ambiguity of slavery and freedom as revealed in Margaret Morgan's status in Maryland and in Pennsylvania, as well as looking closely at the development of case law in both states, this article also provides a thorough… Expand
3 Citations
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