Margaret Mead and behavioral scientists in World War II: problems in responsibility, truth, and effectiveness.

@article{Mabee1987MargaretMA,
  title={Margaret Mead and behavioral scientists in World War II: problems in responsibility, truth, and effectiveness.},
  author={Carleton Mabee},
  journal={Journal of the history of the behavioral sciences},
  year={1987},
  volume={23 1},
  pages={
          3-13
        }
}
  • C. Mabee
  • Published 1987
  • Psychology
  • Journal of the history of the behavioral sciences
In World War II, Margaret Mead and her behavioral science colleagues actively applied their science to the American war effort on issues such as morale, food habits, psychological warfare, and the evacuation of Japanese-Americans from the West Coast. Mead's participation or lack of participation in these activities, and her varying enthusiasms and misgivings about them, raise fundamental issues about the responsibility of behavioral scientists to warn the public against dangerous policies, as… 

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