Mapping the involvement of BA 4a and 4p during Motor Imagery

@article{Sharma2008MappingTI,
  title={Mapping the involvement of BA 4a and 4p during Motor Imagery},
  author={Nikhil Sharma and Peter S. Jones and Adrian T. Carpenter and J. C. Baron},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2008},
  volume={41},
  pages={92-99}
}

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