Mapping brain asymmetry

@article{Toga2003MappingBA,
  title={Mapping brain asymmetry},
  author={A. Toga and P. Thompson},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2003},
  volume={4},
  pages={37-48}
}
Brain asymmetry has been observed in animals and humans in terms of structure, function and behaviour. This lateralization is thought to reflect evolutionary, hereditary, developmental, experiential and pathological factors. Here, we review the diverse literature describing brain asymmetries, focusing primarily on anatomical differences between the hemispheres and the methods that have been used to detect them. Brain-mapping approaches, in particular, can identify and visualize patterns of… Expand
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