Mao and The Da Vinci Code: conspiracy, narrative and history

@article{Goodman2006MaoAT,
  title={Mao and The Da Vinci Code: conspiracy, narrative and history},
  author={David Goodman},
  journal={The Pacific Review},
  year={2006},
  volume={19},
  pages={359 - 384}
}
  • David Goodman
  • Published 2006
  • Philosophy, Sociology
  • The Pacific Review
  • Abstract During the last decade three books have had a disproportionate impact on China Studies because of their controversial interpretations: Jenner's The Tyranny of History, which predicts the disintegration of the Chinese state; Menzies' 1421: The Year China Discovered the World, which describes how Chinese sailors circumnavigated the globe well before any Europeans; and Jung Chang and Jon Halliday's biography Mao: The Unknown Story. All are revisionist histories that amongst other (usually… CONTINUE READING
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