Corpus ID: 16518515

Manual therapy interventions for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review

@inproceedings{Reiman2009ManualTI,
  title={Manual therapy interventions for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review},
  author={Michael P Reiman and Jonathan Harris and Joshua A. Cleland},
  year={2009}
}
Objective: The objective of this paper is twofold (1) determine the quality of current available studies regarding the use of manual therapy intervention for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis LSS and (2) determine the effectiveness of manual therapy for the treatment of LSS. Data sources: A literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE, CINAHL, PEDro and Cochrane Controlled Trials databases. Clinical trials and observational studies were also included. Review methods: Abstracts of… Expand
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AN INTEGRATED EXERCISE APPROACH FOR SECONDARY LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS- A CASE REPORT
TLDR
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