Manual Chronostasis Tactile Perception Precedes Physical Contact

@article{Yarrow2003ManualCT,
  title={Manual Chronostasis Tactile Perception Precedes Physical Contact},
  author={Kielan Yarrow and John C. Rothwell},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2003},
  volume={13},
  pages={1134-1139}
}
When saccading to a silent clock, observers sometimes think that the second hand has paused momentarily. This effect has been termed chronostasis and occurs because observers overestimate the time that they have seen the object of an eye movement. They seem to extrapolate its appearance back to just prior to the onset of the saccade rather than the time that it is actually fixated on the retina. Here, we describe a similar effect following an arm movement: subjects overestimate the time that… CONTINUE READING

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