Maneuvering in juvenile carcharhinid and sphyrnid sharks: the role of the hammerhead shark cephalofoil.

@article{Kajiura2003ManeuveringIJ,
  title={Maneuvering in juvenile carcharhinid and sphyrnid sharks: the role of the hammerhead shark cephalofoil.},
  author={Stephen M. Kajiura and Jesica B Forni and Adam P. Summers},
  journal={Zoology},
  year={2003},
  volume={106 1},
  pages={
          19-28
        }
}
The peculiar head morphology of hammerhead sharks has spawned a variety of untested functional hypotheses. One of the most intuitively appealing ideas is that the anterior foil acts, as in canard-winged aircraft, to increase maneuverability. We tested this hypothesis by determining whether juveniles of two hammerhead species (Sphyrna tiburo and S. lewini) turn more sharply, more often, and with greater velocity than a juvenile carcharhinid shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus). Although the hammerheads… 

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