Maneuverability by the sea lion Zalophus californianus: turning performance of an unstable body design

@article{Fish2003ManeuverabilityBT,
  title={Maneuverability by the sea lion Zalophus californianus: turning performance of an unstable body design},
  author={Frank E. Fish and Jenifer Hurley and Daniel P. Costa},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2003},
  volume={206},
  pages={667 - 674}
}
SUMMARY Maneuverability is critical to the performance of fast-swimming marine mammals that use rapid turns to catch prey. Overhead video recordings were analyzed for two sea lions (Zalophus californianus) turning in the horizontal plane. Unpowered turns were executed by body flexion in conjunction with use of the pectoral and pelvic flippers, which were used as control surfaces. A 90° bank angle was used in the turns to vertically orient the control surfaces. Turning radius was dependent on… 
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