Managing the patient presenting with xerostomia: a review

@article{Visvanathan2010ManagingTP,
  title={Managing the patient presenting with xerostomia: a review},
  author={Vikranth Visvanathan and Paul Nix},
  journal={International Journal of Clinical Practice},
  year={2010},
  volume={64}
}
Aims:  Patients complaining of a dry mouth can present themselves to various clinicians such as the primary care physician, dentists, otolaryngologists and/or oral surgeons. The aim of our review is to provide a systematic method of assessing and managing these patients based on current best evidence published in the literature. 

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...

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