Management of yellow oleander poisoning

@article{Rajapakse2009ManagementOY,
  title={Management of yellow oleander poisoning},
  author={S. Rajapakse},
  journal={Clinical Toxicology},
  year={2009},
  volume={47},
  pages={206 - 212}
}
Background. Poisoning due to deliberate self-harm with the seeds of yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana) results in significant morbidity and mortality each year in South Asia. Yellow oleander seeds contain highly toxic cardiac glycosides including thevetins A and B and neriifolin. A wide variety of bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias occur following ingestion. Important epidemiological and clinical differences exist between poisoning due to yellow oleander and digoxin; yellow oleander… Expand
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