Management of occupational dermatitis in healthcare workers: a systematic review

@article{Smedley2011ManagementOO,
  title={Management of occupational dermatitis in healthcare workers: a systematic review},
  author={Julia Smedley and S. Williams and Penny Peel and Klaus Lj{\o}rring Pedersen},
  journal={Occupational and Environmental Medicine},
  year={2011},
  volume={69},
  pages={276 - 279}
}
Objectives This systematic review informed evidence-based guidelines for the management of occupational dermatitis, with a particular focus on healthcare workers. Methods A multidisciplinary guideline group formulated questions about the management of healthcare workers with dermatitis. Keywords derived from these questions were used in literature searches. We appraised papers and developed recommendations using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (SIGN) methodology. Results… 
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Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Operating Room Scrubs and Disinfectants.
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Dermatoses associadas ao trabalho em profissionais de saúde de um centro hospitalar português
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The prevalence of occupational dermatosis was just 3.56%, which might be explained by previously implemented preventive measures, and the employees most frequently affected were those allocated to surgery departments and nursing assistants.
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