Management of extravasation injuries: A retrospective study

@article{Firat2013ManagementOE,
  title={Management of extravasation injuries: A retrospective study},
  author={Cemal Firat and Serkan Erbatur and Ahmet Hamdi Aytekin},
  journal={Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery},
  year={2013},
  volume={47},
  pages={60 - 65}
}
Abstract The extravasation of many agents during administration by way of the peripheral veins can produce severe necrosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. The incidence of an extravasation injury is elevated in the populations prone to complications, including the younger age groups. The severity of the necrosis depends on properties of the extravasated agent (vinca alkaloids, antracyclines, catecholamines, cationic solutions, osmotically active chemicals) including the type, concentration… 
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