Management of epileptic seizures

@article{Hildebrand2004ManagementOE,
  title={Management of epileptic seizures},
  author={Jerzy Hildebrand},
  journal={Current Opinion in Oncology},
  year={2004},
  volume={16},
  pages={314-317}
}
  • J. Hildebrand
  • Published 1 July 2004
  • Medicine
  • Current Opinion in Oncology
Purpose of review Acquired epileptic seizures are common in cancer patients. They heavily impact on the quality of life and may affect survival. Most patients are medically treated, but the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in neuro-oncology is complicated by serious specific side effects and interference of AEDs with other commonly prescribed drugs such as chemotherapeutic agents and corticosteroids. The main purpose of this review is to help the clinician to select the most appropriate drug… Expand
The Management of Seizures in Brain Tumor Patients
  • Kristen Smith
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of neuroscience nursing : journal of the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses
  • 2010
TLDR
Since the 1990s, newer antiepileptic drugs, which have fewer drug interactions, have been introduced and show promise as first-line therapy and adjunct treatment of epilepsy. Expand
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TLDR
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Seizure control in brain tumors.
TLDR
Because of potential inefficacy of chemotherapy, the use of enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) in patients with a brain tumor is discouraged and the authors’ preference is to start with valproic acid and, if insufficient, to use it in combination with levetiracetam. Expand
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TLDR
Preliminary open data indicate that add-on treatment with LEV in patients with brain tumours is safe and appears to be effective in reducing seizure frequency. Expand
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