Management of agricultural insects with physical control methods.

@article{Vincent2003ManagementOA,
  title={Management of agricultural insects with physical control methods.},
  author={C. Vincent and G. Hallman and B. Panneton and F. Fleurat-lessard},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2003},
  volume={48},
  pages={
          261-81
        }
}
Ideally, integrated pest management should rely on an array of tactics. In reality, the main technologies in use are synthetic pesticides. Because of well-documented problems with reliance on synthetic pesticides, viable alternatives are sorely needed. Physical controls can be classified as passive (e.g., trenches, fences, organic mulch, particle films, inert dusts, and oils), active (e.g., mechanical, polishing, pneumatic, impact, and thermal), and miscellaneous (e.g., cold storage, heated air… Expand
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