Management of Extravasation Injuries: A Focused Evaluation of Noncytotoxic Medications

@article{Reynolds2014ManagementOE,
  title={Management of Extravasation Injuries: A Focused Evaluation of Noncytotoxic Medications},
  author={Paul M. Reynolds and Robert MacLaren and Scott W. Mueller and Douglas N. Fish and Tyree H. Kiser},
  journal={Pharmacotherapy: The Journal of Human Pharmacology and Drug Therapy},
  year={2014},
  volume={34}
}
Extravasations are common manifestations of iatrogenic injury that occur in patients requiring intravenous delivery of known vesicants. These injuries can contribute substantially to patient morbidity, cost of therapy, and length of stay. Many different mechanisms are behind the tissue damage during extravasation injuries. In general, extravasations consist of four different subtypes of tissue injury: vasoconstriction, osmotic, pH related, and cytotoxic. Recognition of high‐risk patients… Expand
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