Management of Acute and Recurrent Gout: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians.

@article{Qaseem2017ManagementOA,
  title={Management of Acute and Recurrent Gout: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians.},
  author={Amir Qaseem and Russell P. Harris and Mary Ann Forciea},
  journal={Annals of internal medicine},
  year={2017},
  volume={166 1},
  pages={
          58-68
        }
}
Description The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on the management of gout. Methods Using the ACP grading system, the committee based these recommendations on a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials; systematic reviews; and large observational studies published between January 2010 and March 2016. Clinical outcomes evaluated included pain, joint swelling and tenderness, activities of daily… 

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