Managed grazing and seedling shelters enhance oak regeneration on rangelands

@article{McCreary2005ManagedGA,
  title={Managed grazing and seedling shelters enhance oak regeneration on rangelands},
  author={Douglas D. McCrearyD.D. McCreary and Melvin R. George},
  journal={California Agriculture},
  year={2005},
  volume={59},
  pages={217-222}
}
Livestock grazing remains a common practice on California's hardwood rangelands. This can create problems for oak regeneration because grazing has been identified as one of the factors limiting the establishment of certain oak species. Previous research, as well as recent studies at the UC Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center, suggests that cattle will damage both planted and/or naturally occurring oaks, but damage varies by season with less during the winter when deciduous oaks do not… 

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