Mammals in Which Females are Larger Than Males

@article{Ralls1976MammalsIW,
  title={Mammals in Which Females are Larger Than Males},
  author={Katherine Ralls},
  journal={The Quarterly Review of Biology},
  year={1976},
  volume={51},
  pages={245 - 276}
}
  • K. Ralls
  • Published 1 June 1976
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • The Quarterly Review of Biology
Females are larger than males in more species of mammals than is generally supposed. A provisional list of the mammalian cases is provided. The phenomenon is not correlated with an unusually large degree of male parental investment, polyandry, greater aggressiveness in females than in males, greater development of weapons in females, female dominance, or matriarchy. The phenomenon may have evolved in a variety of ways, but it is rarely, if ever, the result of sexual selection acting upon the… 
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