Mammalian gene evolution: Nucleotide sequence divergence between mouse and rat

@article{Wolfe2004MammalianGE,
  title={Mammalian gene evolution: Nucleotide sequence divergence between mouse and rat},
  author={Kenneth H. Wolfe and Paul M. Sharp},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2004},
  volume={37},
  pages={441-456}
}
As a paradigm of mammalian gene evolution, the nature and extent of DNA sequence divergence between homologous protein-coding genes from mouse and rat have been investigated. The data set examined includes 363 genes totalling 411 kilobases, making this by far the largest comparison conducted between a single pair of species. Mouse and rat genes are on average 93.4% identical in nucleotide sequence and 93.9% identical in amino acid sequence. Individual genes vary substantially in the extent of… 
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