Mammalian eusociality: a family affair.

@article{Jarvis1994MammalianEA,
  title={Mammalian eusociality: a family affair.},
  author={Jennifer U. M. Jarvis and M. Justin O'Riain and Nigel Charles Bennett and Paul W. Sherman},
  journal={Trends in ecology \& evolution},
  year={1994},
  volume={9 2},
  pages={
          47-51
        }
}
Comparative studies of two species of mole-rat are helping to clarify the ecological correlates of mammalian eusociality. Both species live in social groups composed of close kin, within which breeding is restricted to one female and one to three males. They inhabit xeric areas with dispersed, patchy food and unpredictable rainfall. During droughts, they can neither expand their tunnel systems nor disperse. In brief periods after rain the animals must cooperate and dig furiously to locate rich… Expand
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